10 Early Symptoms of Dementia You Should Know

10 Early Symptoms of Dementia

Dementia is a collection of symptoms that can occur due to any one of a number of possible diseases. Dementia symptoms include cognitive impairment, i.e., interruption of thought processes, difficulties with communication, and ability to recollect. If you or your loved one is experiencing memory problems, it is inappropriate to immediately jump to the conclusion that dementia is the underlying culprit. A dementia diagnosis requires a person needs to have at least two types of impairment that significantly interfere with everyday life to receive a dementia diagnosis. Subtle short term memory changes or trouble with memory can be an early symptom of dementia. The changes are often subtle and tend to involve short-term memory. An older person may be able to remember events that took place years ago but not what they had for breakfast.

Other symptoms of changes in short-term memory include forgetting where they left an item, struggling to remember why they entered a particular room, or forgetting what they were supposed to do on any given day. Difficulty finding the right words Another early symptom of dementia is struggling to communicate thoughts. A person with dementia may have difficulty explaining something or finding the right words to express themselves. Having a conversation with a person who has dementia can be difficult, and it may take longer than usual to conclude.

    Changes in Mood

A change in mood is also common with dementia. If you have dementia, it isn’t always easy to recognize this in yourself, but you may notice this change in someone else. Depression, for instance, is typical of early dementia. Along with mood changes, you might also see a shift in personality. One typical type of personality change seen with dementia is a shift from being shy to outgoing.

This is because the condition often affects judgment.

    Apathy

Apathy, or listlessness, commonly occurs in early dementia. A person with symptoms could lose interest in hobbies or activities. They may not want to go out anymore or do anything fun. They may lose interest in spending time with friends and family, and they may seem emotionally flat.

    Difficulty Completing Normal Tasks

A subtle shift in the ability to complete normal tasks may indicate that someone has early dementia. This usually starts with difficulty doing more complex tasks like balancing a checkbook or playing games that have a lot of rules. Along with the struggle to complete familiar tasks, they may struggle to learn how to do new things or follow new routines.

    Confusion

Someone in the early stages of dementia frequently becomes confused. When memory, thinking, or judgment lapses, occur, confusion may also arise as the person can no longer remember faces, find the right words, or interact with others normally. Confusion occurs for a number of reasons and applies to different situations. For example, the person may misplace their car keys, forget what comes next in the day, or have difficulty remembering someone they’ve met before.

    Difficulty Following Storylines

Difficulty following storylines is a classic indicator of early dementia. Just as finding and using the right words becomes difficult, people with dementia sometimes forget the meanings of words they hear or struggle to follow along with conversations or TV programs.

    A Failing Sense of Direction

Dementia onset commonly brings with it the deterioration of the sense of direction and spatial orientation.

This can mean not recognizing once-familiar landmarks and forgetting regularly used directions. It also becomes more difficult to follow a series of directions and step-by-step instructions.

    Repetitiveness

Repetition is common in dementia because of memory loss and general behavioral changes. The person may repeat daily tasks, such as shaving, or they may collect items obsessively. They also may repeat the same questions in a conversation after they’ve been answered.

    Difficulties adapting to change

For someone in the early stages of dementia, the experience can cause fear. Suddenly, they can’t remember people they know or follow what others are saying. They can’t remember why they went to the store, and they get lost on the way home. Because of this, they might crave routine and be afraid to try new experiences. Difficulty adapting to change is also a typical symptom of early dementia.

If you know someone dealing with these indications and want to know how to plan for the inevitable consequences of dementia, use the scheduling robot to set up an appointment to discuss planning options in confidence.

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Aging Parents Can Forget to Pay Premiums Leading to Policy Lapses With Disastrous Consequences

If your older relative has a long-term care policy, photocopy the page listing the company, policy number and claims contact information. Keep the insurance company updated on new addresses, yours (if you are the third-party designee) and your relative’s. It wouldn’t hurt, if the policyholder is becoming forgetful, to check bank statements or call the company to make sure premiums are current.  One story reported by the NY Times shows the calamity that befell a Virginia family because paying the premiums slipped dad’s mind.  State legislatures seem hesitant to correct the problem by mandating insurance companies give more formal notice to policy holders or their third-party designees.

Use These 5 Strategies to Avoid Stress in Older Family Members or Those Cognitively Impaired

Following are five suggestions that may help elderly family members better enjoy the holiday festivities when all the younger family members are stirring up a ruckus celebration:

1. Prevent your elderly family members suffering from dementia from too much excitement or things like camera flashes, multiple blinking lights, over-exhuberant youngsters asking too many questions and generally just too many simultaneous visitors.  Their own inability to process information at the same pace can lead to frustration and disruptive behavior on their part in response.

2. Try to help the elderly stay in a good frame of mind by playing softer music and familiar songs to soothe their mood(s).  Perhaps predictably, those suffering from various forms of cognitive impairment, such as Alzheimer’s or other dementia, have shown positive reactions to hearing their favorite kind of music.

3. Protect your aging parent with dementia from loud noises, even loud talking and laughter that seem part of a normal day of celebration. A person with dementia can become upset by loud noises, even if they are happy sounds.

4.  Like most of us, but especially those elderly suffering from cognitive impairment, need quiet time, for rest, reflection and repose.  Too much conversation and holiday excitement among family members can agitate the elder.  Subtle signs of fatigue or frustration are indicators that a break from the action is appropriate for them.

5. Stay on their current schedule. Keep the elderly family member(s) eating at that same times that they always do.  Otherwise, disrupting their routine could create unnecessary stress or confusion.

Our thanks to Dr. Mikol Davis at http://agingparents.com for this information.