10 Early Symptoms of Dementia You Should Know

10 Early Symptoms of Dementia

Dementia is a collection of symptoms that can occur due to any one of a number of possible diseases. Dementia symptoms include cognitive impairment, i.e., interruption of thought processes, difficulties with communication, and ability to recollect. If you or your loved one is experiencing memory problems, it is inappropriate to immediately jump to the conclusion that dementia is the underlying culprit. A dementia diagnosis requires a person needs to have at least two types of impairment that significantly interfere with everyday life to receive a dementia diagnosis. Subtle short term memory changes or trouble with memory can be an early symptom of dementia. The changes are often subtle and tend to involve short-term memory. An older person may be able to remember events that took place years ago but not what they had for breakfast.

Other symptoms of changes in short-term memory include forgetting where they left an item, struggling to remember why they entered a particular room, or forgetting what they were supposed to do on any given day. Difficulty finding the right words Another early symptom of dementia is struggling to communicate thoughts. A person with dementia may have difficulty explaining something or finding the right words to express themselves. Having a conversation with a person who has dementia can be difficult, and it may take longer than usual to conclude.

    Changes in Mood

A change in mood is also common with dementia. If you have dementia, it isn’t always easy to recognize this in yourself, but you may notice this change in someone else. Depression, for instance, is typical of early dementia. Along with mood changes, you might also see a shift in personality. One typical type of personality change seen with dementia is a shift from being shy to outgoing.

This is because the condition often affects judgment.

    Apathy

Apathy, or listlessness, commonly occurs in early dementia. A person with symptoms could lose interest in hobbies or activities. They may not want to go out anymore or do anything fun. They may lose interest in spending time with friends and family, and they may seem emotionally flat.

    Difficulty Completing Normal Tasks

A subtle shift in the ability to complete normal tasks may indicate that someone has early dementia. This usually starts with difficulty doing more complex tasks like balancing a checkbook or playing games that have a lot of rules. Along with the struggle to complete familiar tasks, they may struggle to learn how to do new things or follow new routines.

    Confusion

Someone in the early stages of dementia frequently becomes confused. When memory, thinking, or judgment lapses, occur, confusion may also arise as the person can no longer remember faces, find the right words, or interact with others normally. Confusion occurs for a number of reasons and applies to different situations. For example, the person may misplace their car keys, forget what comes next in the day, or have difficulty remembering someone they’ve met before.

    Difficulty Following Storylines

Difficulty following storylines is a classic indicator of early dementia. Just as finding and using the right words becomes difficult, people with dementia sometimes forget the meanings of words they hear or struggle to follow along with conversations or TV programs.

    A Failing Sense of Direction

Dementia onset commonly brings with it the deterioration of the sense of direction and spatial orientation.

This can mean not recognizing once-familiar landmarks and forgetting regularly used directions. It also becomes more difficult to follow a series of directions and step-by-step instructions.

    Repetitiveness

Repetition is common in dementia because of memory loss and general behavioral changes. The person may repeat daily tasks, such as shaving, or they may collect items obsessively. They also may repeat the same questions in a conversation after they’ve been answered.

    Difficulties adapting to change

For someone in the early stages of dementia, the experience can cause fear. Suddenly, they can’t remember people they know or follow what others are saying. They can’t remember why they went to the store, and they get lost on the way home. Because of this, they might crave routine and be afraid to try new experiences. Difficulty adapting to change is also a typical symptom of early dementia.

If you know someone dealing with these indications and want to know how to plan for the inevitable consequences of dementia, use the scheduling robot to set up an appointment to discuss planning options in confidence.

As found on Youtube

Children of Abusive Parents More Likely to Suffer Depression in Caring for Them as Elders

A Boston College study conducted from 2003-2005 shows that the impact of abuse never fades.  The study surveyed over 1,000 participants and ranked them into the following three categories:  1) those with no history of childhood abuse or neglect; 2) those who had been abused and were caring for their non-abusive parent; and 3) those who had been abused and were, to borrow the study’s memorable title, “caring for my abuser.”  Researchers also compared caregivers neglected as children with those who were not neglected.

Unsurprisingly, adults who were abused by their parents as children were more likely to show signs of depression, like lack of appetite, insomnia, trouble concentrating, sadness and lethargy, when caring for those elderly parents as adults.  But a stronger link arose for those category 3, caring for the abusive parent.  Those abused children caring for their abusive parent were still affected by that abuse and suffered from more depression than those in the other categories.

So, a person falling into one of these categories, especially category 3, has to really ask themselves whether they wish to subject themselves to this kind of risk to their own health as adults.  Worse, this finding raises the ugly specter of whether the abused child will succumb to the increased risk that they will abuse their charges, perpetuating a sorrowful cycle, if the care-giving becomes overwhelming.  Clearly, the natural feelings of revenge could easily surmount any obligatory honor or other societal barriers that otherwise keep in check these more primitive urges.

Whether it is those that are forced to care for their elderly parents who were abusive to them when they were children because there is no alternative or if there are other factors which place the adult children in such a precarious position, those who must engage or who choose to engage in the caregiver role must steel themselves for the impact on their own health.  They should be aware of the signs and symptoms of depression and methods of dealing with it such as therapy or support groups.  What is clear is that more resources need to be made available to care for the aging other than reliance on unpaid family caregivers.  For, as this article concludes, “Not only nice people get old.”

[polldaddy poll=7752590]

NY Times Article:  A Risk in Caring for Abusive Parents