Tech & LTC: Today’s 1-Time Diagnostic Labs Will Morph Into Real-Time Monitoring

Roles for Tech in Long-Term Care (1):
 
We anticipate that today’s discrete element testing services such as the LabCorp and Quest Diagnostic types, will morph into real-time data gathering models using wearable or implantable devices. Implants like pacemakers have been around for decades. So we’d expect little push-back on those such devices. If we compare that experience with the new implantable glucometers, which can be implanted directly into the senior’s body to track vitals, then perhaps we will get a more welcoming atmosphere for hi-tech monitoring devices. The key to understanding the monitoring is to understand that the information gathered upon which the care team makes decisions is always accurate. Because they are connected, data from these personal devices will be sent to cloud servers by such firms where it will be analyzed and crunched to determine individual patient trends and insights for the patient themselves, and their doctors and family. Ongoing reports will show important discoveries such as a decline in sleeping or exercise, or that insulin levels rise or drop at certain points in the day. Medical intervention can also occur immediately when required. So this type of real-time monitoring will occur not only in hospitals, where we have grown accustomed to IV monitors and such constantly clicking off data observations, but also in the home and about town–for off-site physicians as well as the patient themselves or family members.
 
For those persons suffering from cardiac, diabetes, or hypertension, hi-tech solutions come as biometric sensors, and smart glucometers. These wearable devices track vital signs and send emergency emails or texts in real time to care providers if current reading are outside expected parameters. They can also detect low levels of movement and “abnormal sleeping habits.” Such constant data gathering and monitoring to state individual norms and tracking against those provides necessary information needed by care teams so they can track behavior patterns and check on patients as required.
 
Before we go into the privacy concerns that should be clicking off alarm bells in your minds, we’ll go through several other areas where tech will be constantly monitoring us. “I always feel like somebody’s watching me….”

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